I Ain't Quiet

Everyone Else is Too LOUD

55,354 notes

studgenius:

jessicaisgray:

"When I got into the music industry a majority of female artists I’d seen were trying to regurgitate an ideal of the female image. They were trying to be almost a replica of what was popular. I just found that to be very boring and dishonest. I just wanted to be in control of my clothes. I wanted that choice. That’s the only thing that I’m saying. Women should not be marginalized. We shouldn’t play into the sexism." - Janelle Monae [x[

Once again for the people who insist on using Jane as the mascot for their respectability politricks and bullshit. Just seen some clowns trying to use her to tear down Rihanna the other day. Cut that shit out.

(via readthisnotthat)

1,530 notes

uicspecialcollections:

conservethis:

ruudbaan:

Gil by Ruud Baan, Isis Vaandrager

ಠ_ಠ
This is pretty much exactly the wrong way to pull a book off the shelf. 
I bet that guy’s library is just full of books with torn headcaps.
The RIGHT way is to push the surrounding books back, then grasp the book you want by the MIDDLE OF THE SPINE. Then you can pull it off the shelf. 
Like so (image from University of Delaware libraries): 


*~the more you know~*

uicspecialcollections:

conservethis:

ruudbaan:

Gil by Ruud Baan, Isis Vaandrager

ಠ_ಠ

This is pretty much exactly the wrong way to pull a book off the shelf. 

I bet that guy’s library is just full of books with torn headcaps.

The RIGHT way is to push the surrounding books back, then grasp the book you want by the MIDDLE OF THE SPINE. Then you can pull it off the shelf. 

Like so (image from University of Delaware libraries): 

*~the more you know~*

136 notes

[Readers] want the writer to have some sort of personal experience with the narrative. It’s bizarre. People are expecting fiction to be real. We don’t want our writers to write about magic without having grown up in a family full of magicians. The same thing happens when you put people in these boxes. I can’t think of a novel published recently that is a person of one race writing about another race that’s met with much critical success. Why? Why can’t we? That’s our job as writers: To step out of our skins and into other people’s. To the extent that we’re not doing that, we’re not doing our jobs.
The Rumpus Interview With Jacinda Townsend (via readthisnotthat)

(Source: therumpus, via readthisnotthat)

715 notes

pennyfornasa:

"A scientific colleague tells me about a recent trip to the New Guinea highlands where she visited a stone age culture hardly contacted by Western civilization. They were ignorant of wristwatches, soft drinks, and frozen food. But they knew about Apollo 11. They knew that humans had walked on the moon. They knew the names of Armstrong and Aldrin and Collins. They wanted to know who was visiting the moon these days." - Carl SaganAfter traveling four days and more than 238,900 miles, the Lunar Module Eagle began its descent to the surface of the Moon. Very early on, however, it became clear to Aldrin and Armstrong that their telemetry was incorrect as they recognized lunar landmarks were being passed too early. At approximately 6,000 miles above the surface, numerous guidance computer program alarms distracted the crew as they communicated with flight controllers. Mission Control engineers soon reassured the Eagle to continue with the descent as it was determined that their system was being overloaded with extra tasks not necessary to land on the Moon. After looking out of the window a few moments later, Armstrong was forced to take semi-manual control as he noticed that the navigational systems were guiding them towards an area comprised of boulders and an uneven landing surface. This manual override would require Aldrin to call out velocity and altitude data before landing fuel ran out. After a somewhat frantic period, the Lunar Module safely landed on the moon on July 20th, 1969 — with about 25 seconds of fuel remaining.As an estimated 600 million people watched, Neil Armstrong became the first ambassador of the planet Earth to walk on another world. For over 2.5 hours, he and Buzz Aldrin captured the imagination of our species as they performed various scientific and geological experiments. Along with planting an American flag, a commemorative plaque marking this monumental human achievement was mounted to the Apollo 11 Lunar Module — and remains as a relic of humanity’s first journey on the Moon.“We came in peace for all mankind. That statement really to me was a very symbolic one — not just of our mission, but of the entire Apollo effort.” - Buzz Aldrin, Apollo 11 Lunar Module PilotApollo 11 was arguably our most exciting adventure, and over the span of three years, NASA sent a total of 12 astronauts to explore the Moon. However, not since 1972 have human beings been beyond low-Earth orbit. Please watch our video, The Spirit of Apollo, and consider what raising the NASA budget will once again do for our society.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_G6jhUznonU

pennyfornasa:

"A scientific colleague tells me about a recent trip to the New Guinea highlands where she visited a stone age culture hardly contacted by Western civilization. They were ignorant of wristwatches, soft drinks, and frozen food. But they knew about Apollo 11. They knew that humans had walked on the moon. They knew the names of Armstrong and Aldrin and Collins. They wanted to know who was visiting the moon these days." - Carl Sagan

After traveling four days and more than 238,900 miles, the Lunar Module Eagle began its descent to the surface of the Moon. Very early on, however, it became clear to Aldrin and Armstrong that their telemetry was incorrect as they recognized lunar landmarks were being passed too early. At approximately 6,000 miles above the surface, numerous guidance computer program alarms distracted the crew as they communicated with flight controllers. Mission Control engineers soon reassured the Eagle to continue with the descent as it was determined that their system was being overloaded with extra tasks not necessary to land on the Moon. After looking out of the window a few moments later, Armstrong was forced to take semi-manual control as he noticed that the navigational systems were guiding them towards an area comprised of boulders and an uneven landing surface. This manual override would require Aldrin to call out velocity and altitude data before landing fuel ran out. After a somewhat frantic period, the Lunar Module safely landed on the moon on July 20th, 1969 — with about 25 seconds of fuel remaining.

As an estimated 600 million people watched, Neil Armstrong became the first ambassador of the planet Earth to walk on another world. For over 2.5 hours, he and Buzz Aldrin captured the imagination of our species as they performed various scientific and geological experiments. Along with planting an American flag, a commemorative plaque marking this monumental human achievement was mounted to the Apollo 11 Lunar Module — and remains as a relic of humanity’s first journey on the Moon.

“We came in peace for all mankind. That statement really to me was a very symbolic one — not just of our mission, but of the entire Apollo effort.” - Buzz Aldrin, Apollo 11 Lunar Module Pilot

Apollo 11 was arguably our most exciting adventure, and over the span of three years, NASA sent a total of 12 astronauts to explore the Moon. However, not since 1972 have human beings been beyond low-Earth orbit. Please watch our video, The Spirit of Apollo, and consider what raising the NASA budget will once again do for our society.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_G6jhUznonU

(via we-are-star-stuff)

1,797 notes

He forced Hermione to show Snape her teeth - she was doing her best to hide them with her hands, though this was difficult as they had now grown past her collar. … Snape looked coldly at Hermione, then said, ‘I see no difference.’
Hermione let out a whimper, her eyes filled with tears, she turned on her heel and ran, ran all the way up the corridor and out of sight.
A little something for all “Snape was a nice dude who was just misunderstood” people to remember (via theresavoidinmypolaroid)

(via readthisnotthat)

12 notes

ex-tabulis:

Here’s How to Know What Edits Governments Are Making on Wikipedia

and

How Web archivists and other digital sleuths are unraveling the mystery of MH17 (using Twitterbots and the Wayback Machine)

Two interesting articles shared by a coworker.

12 notes

Where Online Services Go When They Die - Benj Edwards - The Atlantic

libralthinking:

Fascinating and important. Read this! Attempts to locate and archive anything left of the amazing pre-Internet service “Prodigy” (My first “Internet”). Archivists should read this, and everyone else should read it to have some inclination about early life as the Internet was emerging. Also pithy quotes that resonate far beyond the story in this particular article such as “But even an insurmountable tide of customer goodwill cannot stop one of the most sacred laws of the free market: that unprofitable products, even if they happen to be one-of-a-kind repositories of digital human culture, eventually meet their end at the hands of a corporation that needs to make money to survive.”

READ READ READ (long read)